Texas Alliance for Patient AcCess

P. O. Box 684157 | Austin, Texas 78768-4157

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway  |  Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

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Record Number of Doctors Arriving to Care for Texas Patients

Yes, we need more doctors, but our physician growth rate is actually quite impressive. The ratio of patient-care physicians to Texas' overall population hit an all-time high in 2019, according to data released by the Texas Department of State Health Services. But that's not the really good news. The best news is that the ratio has grown without interruption in each year of the past decade

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THE DOCTOR IS IN

Inflating Texas med-mal cap would slow physician growth, reverse post reform gains, says expert.

AUSTIN — On Monday, Texas House members heard testimony on HB 765, which seeks to collapse the fixed cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice lawsuits and adjust it for inflation each year.

William Hamm, a Ph.D. economist with the Berkeley Research Group told committee members that his research shows that indexing the cap will slow or even reverse the post-reform physician gains.

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Study: "The Impact of Medical Liability Reform on Access to Health Care in Texas"

Baby Tinslee Lewis case attracts attention from anti-abortion groups

Cases like Tinslee’s are not easy for anybody. Medical interventions are prolonging her death and causing her further pain and suffering without the hope of improving her condition.

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Medical complexities of Ebstein Anomaly

Link to: TAPA COALITION brief

Texas Right to Life 1999 Testimony

Study finds no correlation between harsher medical liability laws and improved patient care

Despite claims by the trial lawyers, the threat of a lawsuit or a higher damage award has little to no association with improved healthcare quality and patient safety. The absence of a correlation was the key finding in a recently published study in the Journal of the American Medical Association entitled “Malpractice Liability and Health Care Quality.” The authors found no consistent relationship with patient outcomes in states with harsher tort laws.

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READ THE ABSTRACT

TEXAS' LONG-STANDING MEDICAL LIABILITY REFORMS REMAIN INTACT

For the eighth successive legislative session, Texas’s 2003 medical liability reforms emerged unscathed. Most importantly, we defeated a bill that would have indexed the non-economic damage cap.

This session was the most challenging and gratifying since 2003. Challenging because we were confronted with several troublesome bills; many of them filed by Republicans. Gratifying, because we were equal to the challenge by working together with trust, integrity, forward-thinking, and fair-mindedness.

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Tort refORm saved texas Nursing Homes

San Antonio Express

September 30, 2018

Back in 2002, Manor Park, a not-for-profit in west Texas was paying $150,000 a year for a $1 million insurance policy. A year later they were quoted $465,000 for the same coverage. The board fully realized that they were one broken hip away from bankruptcy.  This community was rated highly by state and national agencies and had a clean record regarding lawsuits.   Alan Hale, CEO of Manor Park says without equivocation, "Texas tort reform saved our organization and the residents that we serve."

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More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

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Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

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Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

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What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Texas Alliance for Patient AcCess

P. O. Box 684157 | Austin, Texas 78768-4157

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway  |  Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Texas Alliance

for Patient AcCess

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

 Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

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Texas Alliance for Patient AcCess

P. O. Box 684157 | Austin, Texas 78768-4157

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info