HUNDREDS OF NEW RESIDENTS PLANNED COULD EASE DOCTOR SHORTAGE IN TEXAS

KERA-TV News

June 18, 2018

Texas turns out plenty of medical school graduates, but there are not enough residencies to help retain them, a local doctor says. And that imbalance is contributing to a shortage of physicians in the state.

That's why Medical City Healthcare, UNT Health Science Center and HCA Healthcare are joining forces to create about 500 new residencies over the next five to seven years.

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WHY TEXAS NEEDS MORE DOCTORS

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EMPLOYMENT PROTECTIONS PRESERVED IN LANDMARK COURT RULING

Medical school employees do not lose their immunity from lawsuits when providing patient care at private facilities, according to a ruling earlier this month by the Texas Supreme Court. The high court denied the plaintiff’s appeal on April 6, thus preserving the current law.

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Read TAPA's "friend of the court" brief

Lien on me:

reimbursement rates ruling seen as game-changer fOR medical billing litigation

A recent Texas Supreme Court decision that forces a Houston hospital to disclose reimbursement rates charged to insured patients versus uninsured patients will almost certainly be felt in so-called hospital lien cases, some Texas attorneys believe the decision could be applied to a range of other civil cases in which the reasonableness of a party’s charges is at issue.

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IMPROPER JURY CHARGE NIXES $ 1.9 MILLION VERDICT

On May 25 the Texas Supreme Court tossed a $1.9 million judgment in a medical liability lawsuit over a botched hysterectomy. The high court ruled that the judge’s jury instructions improperly allowed the jury to consider an invalid theory of liability.

The Benge case marks the first instance where TAPA filed briefs not only in the Supreme Court but also in the court of appeals.  Because the focus of the TAPA amicus brief was on the jury charge error, much of the arguments and citations to record cited in the Supreme Court opinion were taken directly from the TAPA brief. The TAPA amicus brief was instrumental in ensuring that Texas law on informed consent remains intact.

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TAPA brief in Benge v. Williams

DOES IMMUNITY FROM MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LEAD TO IMPROVED PATIENT CARE?

The incidence of adverse medical events decreased significantly when physicians received sovereign immunity from medical malpractice claims at a Florida hospital, according to a study published in Health Management, Policy and Innovation.

For this study, researchers examined safety events involving 900 University of Miami medical.....

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Judge lets one-of-a-kind 'futile care' law stand

By Todd Ackerman

September 22, 2017

Updated: September 23, 2017 1:23pm

In a victory for Texas' medical community, a Harris County state district judge Friday rejected a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a state law that allows doctors to withdraw life-sustaining...

TAPA Amicus Brief in Kelly v. Houston Methodist

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More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157  |  2301 South Capital of Texas Highway  |  Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractive lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157  |  2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746  |  512.703.2156