Medical Liability Reforms Key to Texas Patient Access

 “Texas’ medical liability reforms have been nationally considered the gold standard for medical liability legislation,” said Governor Greg Abbott. “Tort reform has significantly reduced lawsuits and liability costs in our state and contributed greatly to the increasing number of doctors practicing in Texas.”

 

See the chart chronicling the biggest gainers and losers of obstetricains.

Texas continues to attract large number of new physicians

The Texas Medical Board received a record 5,717 new physician applications and licensed a near-record number of new doctors for the fiscal year that ended last month. The 4,514 new licensees are the second highest on record, eclipsed only by the 4,719 new doctors licensed a year ago.

Texas has approved more than 50,000 new physicians since the passage of lawsuit reforms 15 years ago. This equates to 1,283 more new licensees per year than occurred during the medical liability crisis years of 2000-2003.

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A fear of lawsuits really does seem to result in extra medical tests

New York Times

July 23, 2018

Doctors are known for complaining about how the malpractice systems adds costs. But it has been hard to prove, until now.

Researchers from Duke and M.I.T. found the possibility of a lawsuit increased the intensity of health care that patients received by about 5 percent –and that those patients who get the extra cost were no better off.

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EMPLOYMENT PROTECTIONS PRESERVED IN LANDMARK COURT RULING

Medical school employees do not lose their immunity from lawsuits when providing patient care at private facilities, according to a ruling earlier this month by the Texas Supreme Court. The high court denied the plaintiff’s appeal on April 6, thus preserving the current law.

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Read TAPA's "friend of the court" brief

Medical Liability Reform Delivering Results for Texas Patients

Because of Proposition 12, medical care is more readily available. More Texans have more treatment options. Frivolous lawsuits have declined. Our courts are less burdened with suspect lawsuits. And what voters passed 15 years this month has become a model for the rest of the nation.

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Tort refrom saved texas Nursing Homes

San Antonio Express

September 30, 2018

Back in 2002, Manor Park, a not-for-profit in west Texas was paying $150,000 a year for a $1 million insurance policy. A year later they were quoted $465,000 for the same coverage. The board fully realized that they were one broken hip away from bankruptcy.  This community was rated highly by state and national agencies and had a clean record regarding lawsuits.   Alan Hale, CEO of Manor Park says without equivocation, "Texas tort reform saved our organization and the residents that we serve."

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More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157  |  2301 South Capital of Texas Highway  |  Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractive lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157  |  2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746

512.703.2156

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

More high-risk doctors are flocking to Texas

Tim Seay, president of Greater Houston Emergency Room Physicians, had grown accustomed to unsuccessfully begging physicians to come to the Houston area. That was before Texas passed health...

Read More

 

Texas knows how to solve health care problems

By Ted Shaw

The Texas Tribune (Online)

April 20, 2015

In 2003, Texas health care was in full-blown crisis.  There were not enough physicians, particularly in high risk, hospital-based specialties, such as obstetrics, neurosurgery and trauma.

Read More

 

Key Court Decisions since the Passage of Reforms

The law is what the courts say it is. Twelve years after its passage most elements of Texas' landmark medical lawsuit reforms have been upheld.  Some of the medical liability provisions have been adjudicated at an intermediate court only. Click here for a chronology of the more significant decisions rendered by the courts.

Brochure

 

Why health reform might increase malpractice lawsuits

The Washington Post

November 4, 2015

A possible unintended consequence of one of health reform's biggest goals — curbing excess health care spending — could be a surge in malpractice lawsuits...

Read More

 

What is a health care liability claim in Texas?

Language in the 2003 reforms created a conundrum for lawyers, judges and health care providers when violations of safety standards were alleged. The Texas Supreme Court largely erased that confusion when it handed down the Ross v. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital decision May 1, 2015. The following is a discussion of the Ross decision with Texas Supreme Court Justice Phil Johnson.

YouTube Video

 

Texas ranks second nationally in retention of in-state trained physicians

A letter to the editor in the August 22 edition of Syracuse.com notes that more than half of newly trained doctors are fleeing the State of New York.

The opinion piece reports that New York trains approximately 16,000 medical students each year. Only 45 percent of those newly-trained physicians choose to stay in-state to work.

The latest facts are even more discouraging. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, only 36.4%--slightly more than a third, of those who received their undergraduate medical education in New York established a medical practice there. That ranks New York, a state with no medical liability reforms, 28th nationally in physician retention.

Meanwhile, California and Texas, two states with comprehensive medical lawsuit reforms, rank first and second nationally, retaining 62.7% and 59.7 of their medical school graduates.

See Chart

Contact: Jon Opelt at opelt@tapa.info

P. O. Box 684157  |  Austin, Texas 78768-4157

2301 South Capital of Texas Highway

Building J-101 Austin, Texas 78746  |  512.703.2156